Visiting Scholar: Dr. Julian Barling



March 14, 2018,  12:00-1:30 p.m., BN-4000


Early Socioeconomic Adversity Affects Later Leadership Emergence


People become leaders for many different reasons—some work-related, some not, and this attracted the attention of scholars for close to a century. Our prior research showed how growing up in poverty negatively impacted the likelihood of becoming a leader. We hypothesized that one reason for this is that the experience of socioeconomic adversity negatively affects the motivation to lead. We developed and tested three separate models, specifying the indirect effects of socioeconomic status on affective-identity, calculative and normative motivation to lead. I will present and discuss the results of this research, as well as findings comparing the relative effects of objective and subjective measures of socioeconomic status, which raise intriguing conceptual and public policy questions.


Dr. Julian Barling FRSC ,Borden Chair in Leadership, Smith School of Business

Julian is the author of The Science of Leadership: Lessons from Research for Organizational Leaders, which was published by Oxford University Press (New York) in 2014. His primary research interests focus on the nature and development of transformational leadership and employee well-being. Julian was formerly the editor of the American Psychological Association's Journal of Occupational Health Psychology. Julian is a Fellow for the Royal Society of Canada, the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Canadian Psychological Association. Julian was the recipient of the Distinguished Contributions to Industrial and Organizational Psychology by the C-SIOP Division of the Canadian Psychological Association, and Lifetime Contributions Award for his research on Work, Stress and Health from the American Psychological Association and the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Research, as well as the European Association for Occupational Health Psychology. Julian has received several teaching awards, including Queen's University's Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Supervision.